modern aesthetics meet minimal wares

Just Men ceramic series

2019

Gay men aren’t special. They are not better, not worse, not gentler, not more dangerous, than any other group of men. They are men who are attracted to other men. Bear, twink, otter, wolf, giraffe, fem, jock, show queen, gipster, daddy, pup, and twunk, are all labels that stereotype and idealize body types of queer men. This body of ceramic pieces utilizes various physical stereotypes of what gay men look like to criticize people's vices, particularly in the context of what a gay man should look like and to some degree act like. I made the features of these ceramic heads exaggerated and illustrative, to make the objects approachable and comical so that viewers can interact and connect to the works on a human level.  I have been questioning queer visibility, and this work is aimed at exploring the material connotations of queerness through the ceramic medium. The figures all share an annoyed gaze which criticize all who stare back. The work for me is both playful, and extremely sad, but is aimed at furthering queer visibility through sculpture.  This narrative considers the current political, and social status’ of queer individuals, and materializes norms and icons associated with queerness into physical objects. When I made these pieces, I was considering iconography that is specific to queerness and even physical stereotypes specific to gay men. While making this work I am considering how elements of stereotypical imagery and language which idealize queer men’s bodies, can be used to normalize queer sexuality. Through these works I aim to question not only the culture I observe, but also humanity and the problems that come with treating any group as an individual stereotype.

Gay men aren’t special. They are not better, not worse, not gentler, not more dangerous, than any other group of men. They are men who are attracted to other men. Bear, twink, otter, wolf, giraffe, fem, jock, show queen, gipster, daddy, pup, and twunk, are all labels that stereotype and idealize body types of queer men. This body of ceramic pieces utilizes various physical stereotypes of what gay men look like to criticize people's vices, particularly in the context of what a gay man should look like and to some degree act like. I made the features of these ceramic heads exaggerated and illustrative, to make the objects approachable and comical so that viewers can interact and connect to the works on a human level.

I have been questioning queer visibility, and this work is aimed at exploring the material connotations of queerness through the ceramic medium. The figures all share an annoyed gaze which criticize all who stare back. The work for me is both playful, and extremely sad, but is aimed at furthering queer visibility through sculpture.

This narrative considers the current political, and social status’ of queer individuals, and materializes norms and icons associated with queerness into physical objects. When I made these pieces, I was considering iconography that is specific to queerness and even physical stereotypes specific to gay men. While making this work I am considering how elements of stereotypical imagery and language which idealize queer men’s bodies, can be used to normalize queer sexuality. Through these works I aim to question not only the culture I observe, but also humanity and the problems that come with treating any group as an individual stereotype.

gay zoom.jpg
gay full.jpg
uni zoom.jpg
unicorn full.jpg
QUEEN CLOSE UP.jpg
bear zoom.jpg
bear full.jpg
close up ginger twink.jpg
GINGER TWINK.jpg
manly man close up.jpg
manly full.jpg
ZOOM twink copy.jpg
twink full .jpg
close up girafe.jpg
giraffe full.jpg